Rush Limbaugh tells Charlamagne tha God he doesn’t believe in white privilege

Conservative personality Rush Limbaugh said he was “sickened” by George Floyd’s death but that he doesn’t believe white privilege exists in a conversation on “The Breakfast Club,” a popular nationally syndicated radio program.

The nearly 30-minute back-and-forth, which also aired on “The Rush Limbaugh Show,” began with Limbaugh describing what happened to George Floyd — the black Minneapolis man whose death in police custody last week ignited global protests — as “senseless.”

“What happened to George Floyd sickened me, and I wanted to reach out to you and tell you all this. I want to make sure you have no doubt and I’m not the only American who feels this way — the senselessness of it,” Limbaugh, 69, said on Monday’s show.

Charlamagne tha God, one of the show’s co-hosts, responded with asking Limbaugh how he would then use his privilege to fight injustice.

“RIP to George Floyd but that was not an isolated incident, this is a regular occurrence,” he said. “How are you going to use your privilege as a white male to combat this prejudice?”

But Limbaugh replied that he “doesn’t buy into the notion of white privilege.”

“I think that’s a liberal, political construct right along the lines of political correctness, it’s designed to intimidate and get people to shut up and admit they’re guilty of doing things they haven’t done,” the radio host said.

“I don’t have any white privilege.”

“You’re being delusional,” Charlamagne, 41, shot back.

“You know what white privilege is? White privilege is what happened to George Floyd wouldn’t have happened to a white man,” he added.

The topic then came up again toward the end of the interview when Limbaugh suggested coming on the program a second time.

But Charlamagne, real name Lenard Larry McKelvey, said he’d only be interested if Limbaugh agreed to an “honest conversation” and stopped denying concepts like white privilege.

Limbaugh doubled down, saying that white supremacy and white privilege is “a construct of today’s Democratic Party.”

“I’m not denying that there are certain individuals out there that think they are better than other people. But structurally, institutionally, white supremacy — that’s a construct,” he said.

“We’re all mistreated. I’ve been fired nine times in my career,” Limbaugh went on, adding “it’s called life and it happens.”

The conversation came about two weeks after presumptive Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden’s controversial appearance on the show. The former vice president ignited a racially charged firestorm when he proclaimed that African American voters “ain’t black” if they were still considering voting for President Trump in November.

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