EPHRAIM HARDCASTLE: Silence is golden for Eugenie and Maitlis

EPHRAIM HARDCASTLE: Silence is golden for Eugenie and Maitlis

Emily Maitlis’s Newsnight interview with Andrew clearly still rankles with his daughter Eugenie. 

She came face to face with Maitlis at the World Economic Forum in Davos but made no effort to meet or greet the former BBC presenter. 

‘There was this dynamic – she was there and I was there,’ recalls Maitlis, confirming they were in the same room. 

‘There was this go-between [saying], “She knows you are here and you know she is there. Maybe don’t meet, don’t talk.”’ 

They didn’t. Who could blame Eugenie?

EPHRAIM HARDCASTLE: Emily Maitlis’s Newsnight interview with Andrew clearly still rankles with his daughter Eugenie

William’s anti-racism statement criticising Susan Hussey without making any attempt to hear his godmother’s version of events nor offer any private support deeply upset the late Queen’s principal lady-in-waiting. 

‘It was the bitterest blow,’ whispers a Buckingham Palace source. 

But I’m told that the Christmas season brought some healing, with godmother and godson clearing the air in a telephone conversation. 

All is well again, says my source, and Lady Susan is on the guest list for the Coronation.

Arriving in Australia to promote her rom-com movie What’s Love Got To Do With It? Jemima Goldsmith, pictured, proudly announces that she’s conquered her fear of flying. 

Two decades ago, she and her two young sons were aboard a British Airways flight when a mentally ill student attacked the cockpit causing them to plummet 10,000 ft before the pilot regained control, averting a crash into the Sudanese desert by seconds. 

‘I’ve finally made it all the way to Sydney,’ she says. 

‘I didn’t think I’d ever make it this far.’

King Charles is not reviving the Coronation tradition of the King’s Champion, in full armour, riding his horse through Westminster Hall. 

Current champion Francis Dymoke, a retired chartered accountant, will have to make do with carrying a banner. 

At George IV’s coronation in 1821, the Champion, having no horse of his own, borrowed one from Astley’s Circus. 

Unfortunately, when the guests applauded the horse took it as a cue to perform his circus tricks and eventually unseated the Champion.

Bruce Gowers, who has died aged 82, triggered the pop music video industry by making Queen’s Bohemian Rhapsody for Top Of The Pops in 1975. 

After it was viewed 1.5billion times on YouTube, he tried to claim royalties but as he hadn’t signed a contract it was deemed the intellectual property of the band. 

His original fee? £500. All together now: ‘He’s just a poor boy…’

Source: Read Full Article