EU braced for pandemonium as Yellow Vests chaos to spread across WHOLE of bloc

Greek MEP admits climate change is an issue 'too big for us'

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Carbon prices across the EU are reaching record-high levels as energy companies prepare to comply with the EU Commission’s new Fit for 55 green rules. The issue is set to spark a clash between the EU executive and the European Parliament where the legislation will be discussed on Tuesday.

Across the EU protests are already erupting against an increase on energy bills, with Spaniards currently taking the lead on the streets of the country.

The daily average price of electricity in the wholesale market broke a new historical record last month in Spain, reaching €124.45 per megawatt per hour (MWh).

Carbon dioxide is also getting ever more expensive in Poland topping €60 for a ton, 12 times more than four years ago.

Polish Prime Minister Mateusz Morawiecki blamed the EU for the rising prices at a conference last week.

He said: “We have here the very expensive climate policy of the European Union.”

Spanish Vice President and Finance Minister Nadia Calviño warned of “social unrest” across the bloc unless Brussels ensures the “green transition” is also “a socially fair transition”.

She told reporters: “We need to be very mindful of the need to adjust our rules … to ensure that we avoid situations such as the one we are living right now with a very strong increase of CO2 prices and also gas prices.

“That’s obviously creating unrest in our populations and pressing … governments to take measures … to minimise the negative impact on household incomes and on the competitiveness of companies, in particular SMEs.”

Fears the increase in prices could spark EU-wide Yellow Vests protests across the bloc are rising among some EU Commissioners.

A third of the EU executive, in July, took issue with Ursula von der Leyen and Frans Timmermans’ plans to widen the scope of the EU’s emission trading system to include households.

Latvia’s Valdis Dombrovskis, Spain’s Josep Borrell and France’s Thierry Breton all spoke against the plan and wanted to make sure their dissent was noted in the minutes of the College meeting.

The European Union’s huge policy package to make good on a pledge to reduce net greenhouse emissions by 55 percent from 1990 levels by 2030 has also stirred opposition from climate campaigners.

Teenage climate activist Greta Thunberg cast doubt on the level of ambition.

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“Unless the EU tear up their new Fitfor55 package, the world will not stand a chance of staying below 1.5°C of global heating. That’s not an opinion, once you include the full picture it’s a scientific fact. MindTheGap between words and action,” she tweeted.

Greenpeace was another high profile dissenter.

“Celebrating these policies is like a high jumper claiming a medal for running in under the bar,” the group’s EU director Jorgo Riss said.

Green politicians in the European Parliament, who had pushed for an emissions cut of 60 percent by 2030, welcomed the proposals but identified room for improvement.

Some of the policies have proposed time horizons of several years, which activists and Green politicians say is too long.

“For all the hype, many policies won’t kick in for 10 years or more, like new polluting cars still being sold up to 2035,” said Greenpeace’s Mr Riss.

Combustion engines are also a bugbear for the Greens/EFA Group in the European Parliament, which called for an end to their sale by 2030.

The inclusion of biomass, produced from burning wood pellets or chips, in its energy plans, has also been divisive.

“Others (other policies) will actually fuel the fire, like labelling the burning of trees as renewable energy,” Riss added.

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