Why George and Charlotte use different surnames to rest of Royal Family

Prince George and Princess Charlotte fight over morning music

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Even though they are members of the Royal Family, Prince George and Princess Charlotte go to school like all children their age. But in school, George and Charlotte are not thought to be known by their royal titles to their teachers and peers. George’s title is His Royal Highness Prince George of Cambridge, while Charlotte’s is Her Royal Highness Princess Charlotte of Cambridge.

What surname do Prince George and Princess Charlotte use?

Prince George and Princess Charlotte both attend school in London, but it is thought the young royals aren’t known by their titles.

The Royal Family does technically have its own surname, but George and Charlotte are thought to use the name Cambridge instead.

In school, they are known as George Cambridge and Charlotte Cambridge, and the name choice has an adorable link to Prince William and Prince Harry.

George and Charlotte’s father William was given the Duke of Cambridge title by the Queen when he married.

So George and Charlotte are thought to use ‘Cambridge’ as their surname as it links to their father’s title.

A similar situation was in place when Prince William and Prince Harry were younger and during their military careers.

As their father was the Prince of Wales, whenever the royals needed a surname they were known as William Wales or Harry Wales.

What is the Royal Family’s surname?

Titled members of the Royal Family don’t usually need to use a surname, and instead, they go by their titles as Prince, Princess, Duke or Duchess.

However, in cases when members of the Royal Family need a surname, they will usually use the name of the royal house.

Previously, King Edward VII was the first monarch of the House of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha.

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But his son, King George V, opted to change the name of the royal house during World War 1 due to anti-German feeling in the country at the time.

The name of perhaps the most iconic royal castle, Windsor, was decreed to be the new name of the royal house, and going forward members of the Royal Family could use the surname of Windsor when necessary.

The royal surname changed once again in 1960 under the reign of Queen Elizabeth II to incorporate Prince Philip’s surname of Mountbatten.

The Royal Family website explains: “The Royal Family name of Windsor was confirmed by The Queen after her accession in 1952.

“However, in 1960, The Queen and The Duke of Edinburgh decided that they would like their own direct descendants to be distinguished from the rest of the Royal Family (without changing the name of the Royal House), as Windsor is the surname used by all the male and unmarried female descendants of George V.

“It was therefore declared in the Privy Council that The Queen’s descendants, other than those with the style of Royal Highness and the title of Prince/Princess, or female descendants who marry, would carry the name of Mountbatten-Windsor.”

Some royals today use the surname Mountbatten-Windsor, including Prince Harry and Meghan, Duchess of Sussex’s son Archie and daughter Lilibet.

Princess Anne also used the surname to sign the marriage register in 1973.

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