Queen Elizabeth II’s ‘very strange’ Christmas gifts from Royal Family members exposed

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The Queen’s much-loved Christmas gift has baffled royal commentators. Royally Obsessed podcast hosts Roberta Fiorito and Rachel Bowie discussed the “very strange” presents the Royal Family buy for each other. They noted that the monarch’s bizarre item was even hung up on the wall in the Balmoral estate.

Ms Fiorito told listeners: “One of the weirdest and funniest revelations was about the Christmas gifts.

“The royals get each other some very strange Christmas gifts.

“One of them was a talking sea bass that the Queen loves.

“According to this, she even put it on the wall at Balmoral.”

She continued: “The theme is that it has to be a silly gift, nothing extravagant for Christmas.

“Meghan did really well the first year and she gave William a spoon that said ‘cereal killer’.

“I think that’s both hilarious and cute.

“Then Kate gave Harry a ‘grow your own girlfriend’ kit.”

Ms Bowie added: “That was way back before Meghan, of course.

“It was a joke that Harry was a ladies man and had a bunch of girlfriends, but couldn’t find the right one.

“Kate really does have a sense of humour, which we don’t get to see that often.”

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As per tradition, the Royal Family spend their Christmas Day at the Sandringham Estate in Norfolk.

Most senior members turn up for the day as part of a “regimented” celebration.

Typically they attend church and exchange gifts.

Breakfast on Christmas day also plays a big part of the celebrations, with a “special name” being used to describe it.

It’s known as ‘mucking in’ and the food is laid out buffet-style.

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